Get in the Pool

My essay analogy about life as a parent with a child with a disability being like trying to swim in a pool has been picked up by BLOOM, online magazine for Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital.

http://bloom-parentingkidswithdisabilities.blogspot.ca/2015/09/its-hard-to-tell-when-special-needs.html

There are some paragraphs in this version that weren’t in the earlier version.

Tina

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6 Responses to Get in the Pool

  1. yup- silently drowning says it all

    • Tina Szymczak says:

      So I guess what we need to do is to figure out how not to drown silently and how to change systems so that drowning isn’t even an option

  2. Ursula says:

    I used to be the kid with undiagnosed Tourette Syndrome, Asperger Syndrome (now just considered autism), possibly OCD etc.
    I was abused, bullied, beat up, yelled at and completely misunderstood as a child.
    I was finally diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome, followed by a diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome at the age of 50.
    When I was 52 I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. In susceptible people (and a LOT of autistic people are), gluten can cause tics, bi-polar, schizophrenia, depression, ADHD, anxiety, meltdowns, and more.
    After being gluten free, probably 95% of my tics (and I had MANY) simply went away to never return. The depression and mood swings went away as well, along with the OCD and gastrointestinal problems. No more meltdowns and anxiety, either.
    I still have the audio processing disorder, being totally literal (don’t try to ‘hint’ at me, it won’t work, I don’t read between the lines), being very gullible, immature for my age (I don’t feel grown-up at the age of 62, with five kids (four are married) and 21 grandchildren). But I usually manage.
    I still have AS (even though I’ve learned to be pretty good at ‘pretending to be normal’ for a limited amount of time), and will usually ‘say the wrong thing’ or being perceived as rude, because I don’t really understand all the crazy social rules our society has cooked up.
    But being gluten and dairy free has made an enormous difference in my life. My thinking is clearer and I am calmer than I used to be.
    I am telling you this, because eliminating gluten and dairy (as well as sugar and artificial colouring in foods) might just help him the way it has helped me. Because both gluten and dairy can cause any ‘mental disorder’ you can think of.

    • Tina Szymczak says:

      Ursula thank you for sharing. We did do an elimination diet and took him completely off of all milk/casein products for about 7 years. In the end he outgrew the allergy to casein and removing gluten never made a difference for him.

  3. Anite Stratton says:

    You touched a place deep inside my heart. I to adopted a son and sadly through choices and decisions made. am now caring for him alone due to divorce . What you wrote made me cry yet was a deep truth no one talks about. Thank you.

  4. Tina Szymczak says:

    Anite – Sorry it has taken me so long to respond – I didn’t get alerted to new comments and I was a little bogged down with depression to remember to look. I wish things were different for you – that must make for some difficult days.

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